• He set out plans for 63 working days of recess time over the next 12 months 
  • Includes seven working weeks in the summer, nine days longer than last year
  • MPs are getting an extra 17 days off, which amounts to more than four of the standard four-day parliamentary weeks

MPs will take the equivalent of four weeks extra holiday this year compared to 2019 under a timetable unveiled today.

Commons Leader Jacob Rees-Mogg set out plans for 63 working days of parliamentary recess time over the next 12 months, including seven working weeks in the summer, nine days longer than last year.

Parliamentary recess in 2019 amounted to just 46 days, not including the time taken up in November and December by the election campaign.

It means MPs are getting an extra 17 days this year, which amounts to more than four of the standard four-day parliamentary weeks, which usually run Monday to Thursday.

MPs will also rise for three-and-a-half weeks in the autumn for the party conferences – and the dates for their Christmas break has yet to be agreed.

Although the Brexit deal is almost certain to be passed to allow the UK to leave the EU on January 31, there is unlikely to be a shortage of work to deal with the aftermath.

With a majority of 80 Boris Johnson’s Government is also expect to put forward a vast swathe of legislation on a host of domestic issues that have been held up by parliamentary paralysis.

But many MPs argue they work for large periods of the recess on constituency business and it is not simply holiday for them.

The average UK holiday entitlement is 33.5 days.

The summer holiday runs for 35 working days, the longest since 2009. MPs and peers will also get an extra nine days at Easter compared to last year.

The two houses of Parliament will also take a break next month, a regular break that was waived last year to allow MPs to wrestle with Theresa May’s Brexit deal.

Last year, then-Commons Leader Andrea Leadsom announced that Parliament would effectively cancel the ten-day break to help push through Brexit-related legislation.

But the move sparked an extraordinary outcry from MPs, who often use the break to hit the slopes or soak up some winter sun.

Parliament’s expenses watchdog was understood to have faced questions from politicians about whether they could claim refunds from the taxpayer for cancelled holidays. Labour asked for compensation for childcare costs.

Today Mr Rees-Mogg also announced the debate on the Queen’s Speech will continue next week.

The State Opening of Parliament took place on December 19 and the debate on the Government’s legislative agenda outlined in the Queen’s Speech usually follows.

However, due to the Christmas recess and the debate on the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill, the Queen’s Speech debate was delayed.